Photo of Philip Wallach

Philip Wallach

Senior Fellow, Governance Project, R Street Institute

Philip A. Wallach is a senior fellow of governance at the R Street Institute, where he researches America’s separation of powers with a focus on the relationship between Congress and the administrative state. He also follows a wide range of regulatory policy issues, including the efficacy of the Trump administration’s deregulatory efforts.

Philip joined R Street in January 2018. He was previously a fellow and then senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, where he authored To the Edge: Legality, Legitimacy, and the Responses to the 2008 Financial Crisis (2015).

Philip received his bachelor’s with honors from Wesleyan University’s College of Social Studies, and his doctorate in politics from Princeton University.

He lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and two daughters.

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What the Democrats should do on trade

December 6, 2018
Reflecting on the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 six months after its passage, Senator Reed Smoot (R-Utah)  declared: “The improvement since passage of the act has been… Read More
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Self-government in a republic of 325 million

November 27, 2018
In the 2016 and 2018 elections, both sides claimed that they represented the “real” American people. Candidates from both parties called for the people to rise up and take the… Read More
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How to restrain the President: Congress and trade policy

November 14, 2018
Since his inauguration, President Trump has levied aggressive, unilateral tariffs on numerous products, which has triggered foreign retaliation against American exports. However, the controlling of international trade is originally Congress’s… Read More
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Echoes of Our Great War

November 9, 2018
When describing the state of American politics today, pundits have often turned to the phrase: “partisan trench warfare.” Martial metaphors of all kinds are ubiquitous in our political commentary, but… Read More
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Just How Abusive Are Our Administrative Courts, Really?

November 7, 2018
In the early months of Donald Trump’s presidency, Steve Bannon thrilled legal conservatives with a declaration that the Trump administration would be committed to a “deconstruction of the administrative state.”… Read More
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The promise our next Speaker will make — and break

November 6, 2018
We don’t know which party will win the majority in tomorrow’s midterms, and so we don’t know who will take the Speaker’s gavel from the retiring Paul Ryan. But, here’s… Read More
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Book review: Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State

October 25, 2018
Sir Paul Tucker is an unusual type. He is a consummate bureaucratic insider—a 30-year veteran of the Bank of England and now the chair of a group of ex-central bankers… Read More
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Congress: Difficult by design

September 18, 2018
Daniel Patrick Moynihan once remarked that “the United States is the one nation in the world with a real legislature.” The senator from New York was boasting of our system, but… Read More
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Polarization is an output of our process, not the cause of all our woes

June 26, 2018
Our recent piece, “Congress is Broken. But don’t blame polarization,” provoked a number of useful discussions about how political scientists should interpret the results of empirical models like DW-NOMINATE. Read More
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LegBranch Conversations: An interview with David Schoenbrod

June 12, 2018
David Schoenbrod is the Trustee Professor of Law at New York Law School. Over the course of his career, he has been a leading practitioner and scholar of environmental… Read More