Photo of Kevin Kosar

Kevin Kosar

Vice President, Policy, R Street Institute

Kevin Kosar is vice president of policy for the R Street Institute, where he oversees all of the institute’s research across its commercial freedom, criminal justice, energy and environment, financial markets, governance, income mobility, innovation policy, insurance and public health policy programs. He co-directs the non-partisan Legislative Branch Capacity Working Group, which aims to strengthen Congress. 

Kevin joined R Street in October 2014 from the Congressional Research Service, where he served as analyst and research manager. Earlier in his career, he was lecturer in policy and public administration at New York University and Metropolitan College of New York.

Kevin is the author of three books: Failing Grades: The Federal Politics of Education, published in 2005; Whiskey: A Global History, published in 2010; and Moonshine: A Global History, published in 2017.

He has been a Presidential Management Fellow and won the Academy of Wine Communications’ wine writer award.

Kevin received his doctorate in politics from New York University and his bachelor’s from Ohio State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Post

ICYMI: Senate leaders do not make the rules

January 25, 2020
After several weeks of uncertainty surrounding President Trump’s impeachment, the Senate is ready to proceed. This week, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY, … Read More
Post

What happened in the Senate on Monday night

January 22, 2020
Yesterday, President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial finally got underway in the Senate. Senators’ first order of business was to decide whether to adopt a package of supplementary rules (… Read More
Post

McConnell’s impeachment rules advantage McConnell

January 21, 2020
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell released the Senate impeachment rules last night. He previously stated the impeachment rules for Trump will follow the Clinton rules. And in a strict… Read More
Post

APSA congressional reform task force report

January 21, 2020
Download the report. Read More
Post

The nuclear option has fizzled, again

January 17, 2020
Source: CNN. In 2013, during the 113th Congress, the Senate Democratic majority temporarily deployed what some have called the “nuclear option,” purportedly to break a confirmation logjam over President… Read More
Post

Hearing on growing government, diminishing congressional capacity, and strengthening Congress

January 15, 2020
The Select Committee on the modernization of Congress held a hearing yesterday. The topic was “restoring capacity and equipping Congress to better serve the American people.” Posted below… Read More
Post

It’s time to amend the War Powers Resolution

January 14, 2020
Source: Defense.gov The House of Representatives voted last week to prevent President Trump from engaging in additional hostilities against Iran without congressional approval. A similar measure is pending… Read More
Post

No, the Senate can’t have a trial before the House sends articles of impeachment

January 13, 2020
President Trump’s Republican allies want the Senate to hold an impeachment trial to prove that the president is not guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors. But Democrats in the House… Read More
Post

Chief Justice can’t forcibly recuse senators

January 9, 2020
Harvard Law Professor Laurence Tribe suggested recently that the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court gets to decide whether he has jurisdiction to forcibly recuse (or disqualify) a senator… Read More
Post

Why taxpayers should support expanding the GAO

January 8, 2020
Congress approved $1.4 trillion in new spending last week to avoid another government shutdown over the holidays. Taxpayers are right to be wary whenever Congress pulls out its checkbook. Read More